Emunah/Faith

My Mother-in-Law: Jewish Heroine and Nazi Killer

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This was published on Aish.com

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Rachel Blum around age 20, about five years after surviving the Holocaust.

It was a daunting assignment: speaking to 120 eighth grade girls about the Holocaust in the last hour of the last day of their school year. Compounding my challenge, it was gloriously sunny outside. The girls would be anxious to take leave for their summer vacation.

In my favor, I was going to tell them a remarkable story: that of my mother-in-law, Rachel Blum, may her soul rest in peace – a story I have told to spell-bound audiences and have recently published in book form under the title Nothing Bad Ever Happens.

I told these teenage girls that my mother-in-law was roughly their age during the war years, beginning in June 1941 when the Nazis invaded her town, until July 1944 when the Russians liberated Lublin where she had been hiding with a non-Jewish family.

Then I dove into the story, which is truly incredible and gripping – including a Hollywood-worthy climax as Rachel rides in the caboose of a speeding train transporting a thousand SS soldiers to Germany. Fearful an SS officer is about to discover she is Jewish, she convinces the conductor – Ivan Roluk, husband of the non-Jewish couple who took her in – to overturn the train by speeding up around a sharp bend and blowing the horn just beforehand to allow her and his family to jump. (It worked, the family survived and many Nazis were killed; 15-year-old Rachel was responsible for the death of more SS Nazis in one shot than the combined efforts of all the legendary fighters of the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising!)

Despite the dramatic nature of that story, I will save the details for the book and instead share another story, one which is in some ways even more incredible.

Rachel’s childhood town, Ludmir, was home to about 22,000 Jews before the war. On Rosh Hashanah 1942, the Nazis, with the help of local collaborators, began marching columns of bedraggled Jews to a spot outside town and machine-gunned them to death into open pits. Between 15,000 and 18,000 Jews lost their lives that way. And Ludmir was just one of countless Jewish towns in Eastern Europe; all told, some million-and-a-half Jews suffered a similar fate under Nazi domination (even before the gas chambers started operating).

Rachel and her family survived thanks to an ingenious attic hideout. And for the next year, she survived by staying in hiding, smuggling in food for her family and ultimately joining the few thousand survivors in the Ludmir ghetto who had been conscripted into brutal slave labor battalions. Over the year, though, each family member was killed or died of starvation.

Finally, on December 25, 1943, the Nazis came to finish off everyone left in the ghetto. In miraculous fashion – Rachel found a hiding place beneath a wooden porch. A few days later she emerged and made her way to a Polish woman her family knew before the war.

This woman risked her life to keep Rachel – until one day when an anti-Semitic neighbor discovered her. Frightened for her own life now, the Polish woman told her she had to leave by the early morning.

It was January 1944. A fresh layer of deep snow lay on the ground. The air was biting cold. And a little girl, improperly dressed, was alone and on the run again.

She wandered the streets of non-Jewish Ludmir for a while before entering a barn. Her entire body chilled to the bone, she found a spot at the far end and stuck her feet into a stack of hay to warm them up.

Suddenly, a woman walked in. Their eyes met. Rachel pleaded with her to be quiet, promising she would be gone by the next morning. The woman said nothing, gathered some items and left.

As the day turned into evening, Rachel prepared to leave. The night before she had experienced a powerful dream where her recently-deceased father appeared to her and told her everything would be alright. Drawing courage from the dream, she exited the barn and approached the house next to it.

She knocked on the door. The woman she had seen earlier in the day opened it and invited her inside. The woman then introduced husband and their seventeen-year-old son (who Rachel later found out worked in the local SS office!). They offered her a bowl of soup. During conversation it emerged that this family, the Roluks, knew Rachel’s father. They praised him for being a very righteous and honest man they had had business dealings with. If they did not have money to pay for the items he gave them on consignment, he did not pressure them to pay.

At this point in the war, both Rachel and the Roluks knew the Nazis would kill any family caught harboring a Jew. Understanding the predicament, Rachel asked Mrs. Roluk if she and her family were religious. She answered affirmatively. Rachel then asked her if they had a Bible. Again affirmative. Rachel next requested that she take the Bible and place it on the table. She did. Finally, Rachel said to the entire family, “I want all of you to place your hands on the Bible.” They complied.

“Now, promise me the following,” the 14-year-old recently orphaned Jewish girl said. “I have nowhere to run. I’m tired and I’m alone. After this, I will go outside to your backyard and lie down in the snow. There I will freeze to death. You will bury me. Now, promise me on this Bible” – and it is difficult to convey the quality of conviction in my mother-in-law’s voice even as she retold it decades later – “that after the war you will find Jewish people and tell that there is a little Jewish girl buried in the backyard. Promise me that you will tell them that her last wish was that she be reburied with other Jews in a Jewish cemetery.”

A deathly silence fell upon the room. The Roluks looked at each other. One by one, they rose from the table and walked into the next room. Rachel could hear them talking. After a while, they returned and said to her, “You will stay with us. We will tell people that you are our niece from another village.”

What the Roluks did not know at the time was that in saving Rachel they were saving themselves – not only in soul but in body too. (This is detailed in the book. Hint: it has to do with the train story above.)

By the end of my lecture, the 120 girls were mesmerized. The most amazing part of Rachel’s story is that – despite the fact that by war’s end she had no family, friends or money – she became the happiest, most active, most loving and helping human being; someone who regularly said with absolute sincerity, “Nothing bad ever happened to me.”

The story of my mother-in-law inspires on many levels. She is a genuine heroine. As Jews, her story impresses upon us an added message: the value of what it means to be Jewish. Perhaps most of all, we learn from her that even if very bad things happen to us, we have within ourselves an astonishing, mysterious, inextinguishable untapped capacity to love; to be truly happy, active, focused and a magnet of joy for others. God knows, the world needs more of that.

Nothing Bad Ever Happens tells the thrilling, true story of Rachel Blum’s struggle to survive in a world bent on destroying her. Click here to order.

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The Liberating Experience of Judgment

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ImageAccording to Judaism,1 each of us undergoes three different types of Days of Judgment Days:

  1. Rosh Hashanah, which is an annual review of one’s actions over the previous year used to determine one’s material circumstances for the upcoming year;
  2. Day of death, which reviews the deceased person’s life and determines whether it is ready for Paradise;
  3. The Great Day of Judgment, which is an event in the future, at the end of history as we know it, when all who lived are resurrected, and are judged whether they are worthy of everlasting life in a spiritualized renewed physical world (according to most authorities) to frolic in the splendor of God’s Presence.

All this judgment strikes the contemporary mind as backward, even offensive. It only reinforces the stereotypic image of “Old Testament” Judaism as a religion of fear, not love.

Well, yes, judgment — whether on Rosh Hashanah, the Day of Death, or the “Great Day of Judgment” — contains the general air of awe and seriousness. There is no sense trying to sugarcoat or diminish the magnitude of these events.

Nevertheless, what’s often lost to the contemporary mind is the liberating experience judgment entails. Perhaps the best illustrations of this are found in a surprising place.
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Rav Elyahshiv, zt’l – From newest Zman

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We go to print with news of the petirah of Maran HaRav Yosef Sholom Elyashiv, zt’l. Although time does not permit an elaborate essay or even the composition of a properly ordered piece, I wanted to share thoughts that came to mind.

The first thought is the timing of his passing, less than 24 hours after the Israeli coalition government dissolved, an event that effectively delays the attempts by ardent secularists to implement enforced conscription of yeshivah students.

The fact is that Torah is the greatest shemirah (protection). More dangerous than Iran with the bomb is a situation of Jews without Torah, c’v. As the Gadol Hador, HaRav Elyashiv not only taught and exemplified Torah values, but was a fountainhead through which Torah flowed down into the world, and which ultimately protected the generation from all sorts of physical and spiritual dangers.

Who knows if during his last days, as his body lay in a debilitated state, his holy neshamah was not rampaging through the heavens to get the decree of forced conscription torn up, and that only after he succeeded was he recalled by the Heavenly Court? Who knows…? It would certainly be a fitting final act for a man who literally dedicated every moment of his life to Torah.

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Rav Miller Book – Table of Contents

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TABLE OF CONTENTS –

Table of Contents – Download (feel free to share)  

DEFINING EMUNAH & BITACHON            

  • What Is Emunah-Bitachon?
  • Why learn about Bitachon?
  • What should one think about when saying the Shema?
  • What is meant by Menuchas HaNefesh (a “Calm Mind”)?
  • How could Elisha Ben Avuya have lost his Emunah?
  • What is meant by pointing at Hashem?
  • How is Emunah “Righteousness”?

ACQUIRING EMUNAH & BITACHON        

  • How does one acquire Emunah?
  • What if one doesn’t have the ability to believe?
  • If Emunah is instinctual why is it so hard to believe?
  • A decent man without Torah?
  • What practical things can a person do to work on Bitachon?

TRUSTING ONLY IN HASHEM     

  • Why was Yosef punished for a minor lack of Bitachon?
  • How does someone deal with betrayal?
  • Why were the younger ones the successful ones?
  • Why does Hashem make things seem hopeless at times?

HISHTADLUS     

  • Wrong Emunah?
  • How much Hishtadlus?
  • Is it possible to forestall trouble?
  • Why did David fight so many battles? Why not have Bitachon?
  • Why does a person have to work?
  • How should one deal with lack of success in Parnassa?
  • How much effort should one put into finding a Shidduch?
  • What does it mean “A person is led the way he wants to go”?
  • Can people die before their time?

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Introduction to the new Rabbi Miller book by Yaakov Astor

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This book is intended for everyone from the most uninitiated to the most advanced student. Indeed, the general topic of emunah and bitachon, “faith and trust,” is for every human being: man and woman, adult and child, Jew and non-Jew. Like a gushing fountain, it’s a never-ending subject, completely replenishing itself with time. The youngest child can attain (and should be taught) some understanding of it while at the same time adults build on that understanding (hopefully) as time goes on.

Rabbi Miller was uniquely qualified to speak on such a subject. He had a special ability to make the most complex subjects sound simple. Of course, no one should mistake this for lack of depth. Indeed, just a perusal of all the sources he drew on, constantly and often just from memory, is testimony to the breadth. His uncanny ability to instantly apply this vast knowledge to every question thrown at him during his thousands of recorded lectures amply demonstrates the depth of this knowledge. (Not that he needed to prove that.)

His same words that struck a chord with the uninitiated caused great excitement to the advanced student. This ability, combined with his vast erudition and depth of knowledge, makes a book by him on the subject of faith something the widest spectrum of people can understand — and not only understand, as Rabbi Miller would say, but to utilize to change and grow; to make oneself a better person.

Although Rabbi Miller authored 12 books on his own, he left thousands of recorded lectures which include many ideas and/or many nuances of ideas that were either not necessarily mentioned in his books or explained in as much detail in those books. Our topic, emunah and bitachon, is implied in and indeed oozes from all his writings and recordings, but none of the books talk about it as explicitly or at least in once concentrated area as we have endeavored here.

This book is based primarily on the following lectures recorded by Rabbi Miller.

  • 1. Singing In The World
  • 23. Forestalling Trouble
  • 241. Bitachon And Hishtadlus
  • 334. Bitachon And Emunah
  • 486. Bitachon: From Nowhere Comes My Help
  • 562. Bitachon I
  • 794. Bitachon And The Calm Mind
  • 946. Three Aspects Of Bitachon
  • S-10. Bitachon 1
  • S-11. Bitachon 2
  • S-12. Bitachon 3
  • S-13. Bitachon 4

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My New Book – R’ Miller on Bitachon

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I’m happy to announce my newest book, Rav Avigdor Miller on Emunah and Bitachon. Please stayed tuned to this blog for excerpts. Meanwhile, here is a brief description of the book:

Rabbi Miller on EmunahVirtually every decision we make is affected by our grasp of the principles of emunah and bitachon (faith and trust in Hashem). But where do we turn to gain clarity about these issues, to find answers to our many questions?

Rav Avigdor Miller, zt”l, answered that need for thousands of Jews, and more than a decade after his passing, he continues to do so. Rav Miller left behind a vast legacy of recorded shiurim and writings. Now, thanks to the efforts of Rabbi Yaakov Astor, an important part of that legacy has been transformed into this monumental book.

The themes of emunah and bitachon permeated a great many of Rav Miller’s shiurim and seforim, but the material was scattered in many different places and was thus hard to access. Now, that eye-opening material has been collected, assembled and organized into a fascinating question-and-answer book, a book that will answer your questions and bring you clarity when you need it most. Rav Miller’s bold, straightforward approach sheds a brilliant light on the most troubling, thorny issues that confront us. His crystal clear Torah wisdom will profoundly impact your life.

“This sefer will surely enlighten and inspire every reader.”
— Rabbi Shmuel Miller, Rosh Yeshiva, Yeshiva Gedolah Bais Yisroel